How can parents help their kids from being bullied?

Parents can play a central role to preventing bullying and stopping it when it happens. Here are a few things you can do.

  • Teach kids to solve problems without using violence and praise them when they do.
  • Give children positive feedback when they behave well to help their build self-esteem. Help give them the self-confidence to stand up for what they believe in.
  • Ask your children about their day and listen to them talk about school, social events, their classmates, and any problems they have.
  • Take bullying seriously. Many kids are embarrassed to say they have been bullied. You may only have one chance to step in and help.
  • If you see any bullying, stop it right away, even if your child is the one doing the bullying.
  • Encourage your child to help others who need it.
  • Don’t bully your children or bully others in front of them. Many times kids who are bullied at home react by bullying other kids. If your children see you hit, ridicule, or gossip about someone else, they are also more likely to do so themselves.
  • Support bully prevention programs in your child’s school. If your school doesn’t have one, consider starting one with other parents, teachers, and concerned adults.

Read more at http://www.ncpc.org/topics/bullying/what-parents-can-do

 

Louisiana teachers arrested in bullying case

Cops: Teacher told girl to kill herself, forced other kids to bully her

 

Forced fights

St. Landry Parish Sheriff Bobby Guidroz said he learned of the accusations back in February after the girl’s mother filed a complaint. The mother returned to the sheriff’s office in April to say the abuse was continuing.
Deputies said Shelvin, a teacher at Washington Elementary, threatened to fail three of her students if they didn’t fight the girl. She also allegedly told the bullied girl to “go and kill herself.”
In a police report obtained by CNN, a student involved in the incident told deputies that Shelvin forced her to start a fight that resulted in several students sent to the principal’s office.

Do you know how the hazing laws differ from state to state?

Today many know that hazing laws exist.  What most don’t know is that specific state laws exist in 44 of the states but differ from state to state.  Some states have pages of laws outlining definitions, details and penalties while others have brief laws.  Does this mean that the states with less outlined in the laws cover less?  What does this mean for your national organizations hazing policies?  To learn more email us at:  info@no2hazing or click here to fill out form

Iota Phi Theta Launches No2Hazing™ Program

Iota Phi Theta rolls out the No2Hazing™ program nationwide.

Course empowers brothers on the important aspects of hazing education:

Identification
Prevention
Reporting

 ___________________________________________________________

“Thank you for the opportunity to complete the No2hazing online training. The content of the course was great. I liked that information specific to my location (DC) was provided and I learned about the laws applicable to me and my chapter. “

Camilo Martinez
Iota Phi Theta Chapter Leader


I would then definitely like to say that taking this course definitely refined and improved my skills in identifying and eliminating hazing. I had absolutely no idea that hazing was so detrimental to our fraternity.  Now I and my chapter brothers, as well as accompanying chapters, can help to ensure intake is conducted safely, in a way that builds candidates/pledges’ character while simultaneously reforming them into the men Iota continues to look for.

Anthony Freeman
Iota Phi Theta Chapter Leader Virginia

First Lady Says She’ll Fight Cyber-Bullying

In a rare campaign speech, Melania Trump said that one of her key issues as First Lady would be to combat cyber-bullying.

“Our culture has gotten too mean and too rough, especially to children and teenagers,” Trump said Thursday afternoon in Pennsylvania. “It is never OK when a 12-year-old girl or boy is mocked, bullied or attacked … It is absolutely unacceptable when it is done by someone with no name hiding on the internet.”  See full article at:  http://time.com

Boy ‘driven to suicide by bullies’

A distraught mother has claimed that her 11-year-old son was driven to suicide by bullies at his school.

Thomas Thompson took an overdose of painkillers after other pupils picked on him because he was clever and well-spoken, she said.

Sandra Thompson found her son in his bedroom when she returned home from work in the evening.

Her partner, Geoff Clarke, tried to resuscitate the youngster while paramedics were called, but he had suffered a fatal heart attack.

Thomas is believed to be the youngest child to take his own life because of alleged bullying.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-187330/Boy-driven-suicide-bullies.html#ixzz4QIMmWdJg
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Just say yes? The rise of ‘study drugs’ in college

Around this time of year, you’re more likely to find college students in the library cramming for final exams than out partying. In an environment where the workload is endless and there’s always more to be done, a quick fix to help buckle down and power through becomes very tempting.
Prescription ADHD medications like Adderall, Ritalin, and Vyvanse are becoming increasingly popular

 

By Arianna Yanes, Special to CNN

Coach: Hazing hurts the whole team

Posted: Aug 13, 2015 3:39 PM EST
Updated: Aug 13, 2015 5:05 PM EST
By Katy Solt

AUGUSTA, GA (WFXG) – There are still many unanswered questions after a student came forward making hazing allegations against his new football teammates. Shakur Chisolm, a star running back who just transferred to Allendale-Fairfax High School, said he and other students were hazed at a summer camp for the football team, and now he wants answers as to why nothing was done.

So what are other schools and state organizations doing to make sure their students aren’t taking part in illegal activities?

A team is supposed to be a second family, a group of friends that will have your back and help out no matter what situation you get into. But what happens when the people who’re supposed to help you, hurt you?

Chisolm said he and other new players on the team were beaten with gloves, belts and fists as part of a team hazing ritual for the school football team.

In Augusta, Westside High School Football Coach Scott Tate said while the specifics on this case haven’t been fully released, hazing doesn’t just hurt one or two players, it hurts the entire team.

“Anytime you’re hazing like that, you’re not taking care of each other,” Tate said. “You want to build each other up, not bring each other down.”

Hazing allegations have not been brought forward in Richmond County, but at Westside, the coaches and players work together to make sure that doesn’t ever happen.

“One thing that we do is we talk to the kids all the time about doing things as a family, being a team, being together, taking care of each other,” Tate said. “You have to work together on the team, and that’s something that we build and we try to do.”

The Georgia High School Association (GHSA) and the South Carolina High School League (SCHSL) both list unsportsmanlike conduct policies on their websites, but neither have a hazing policy listed online. A representative for the SCHSL said the schools handle any cases, and if the league is notified, then they step in to help investigate.

With the school year barely underway, and the teams waiting for the first Friday night game, Tate said the important thing players need to remember is that a team is a family, and you always protect and help your family.

“As a team you’re working to win the game, to have the best season you can,” Tate said. “And if you’re pulling somebody down, you’re not doing that. You need to build each other up.”

Senaca Baines, the principal of Allendale-Fairfax High School, said he was notified of the allegations last Friday, and an investigation was immediately launched. The school is also working with the superintendent on this matter.