New Course Launch: Bystander Intervention: What Would You Do? 

Bystander Intervention: What Would You Do? 

The Bystander Intervention course focuses on students developing the awareness, skills, and courage needed to intervene in a situation when another individual needs help. Our program helps students identify a situation where they might not be directly involved but they recognize a potentially harmful situation and step in to positively change the outcome.  The course objective is to teach students to safely respond to situations where they may help others who are in an unhealthy or  hurtful situation.

Bystander intervention allows individuals to send powerful messages about what is acceptable and expected behavior in our community, on campuses whether  in a group or individual situation.

Click here  for more information.

Bikers and musicians lead high school assembly on bystander intervention

MISSOULA – Rock and country music filled the halls of Loyola Sacred Heart High School Friday afternoon as Bikers Against Bullies and musicians teamed up to help spread the word about bystander intervention.

Jared Weeks from Saving Abel, and Jared Blake, one of Blake Shelton’s Top 4 on the first season of The Voice, performed for the students and discussed what in life they had learned was most important.

“If there was one thing that I hope that the kids take away from the day it would be to realize how much their choices matter, how much their choices influence others around them, but more than that just their life. Everything hinges on the decisions they make,” Blake said.


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9 Ways to Stay Safe on Your College Campus

If 2015 numbers are any indication, more than 20 million students in the U.S. will head to college this fall. Unfortunately, with so many students, dorm rooms, and valuables, even America’s safest college towns experience some forms of crime, including burglaries, thefts, or assaults.

While safety is a priority for most colleges, there are several additional ways you can improve your own safety and keep your belongings secure. Before heading off to college, review these nine safety tips.

1. Familiarize yourself with your school’s Campus Safety office.

2. Take extra precaution at night.

3. Always lock up.

4. Maintain privacy on social media.

See the details and more:


Melissa Darcey

Safest College Campuses 2016


The 2016 Safest College Campuses ranking is based on key statistics and student reviews. Top ranked colleges offer a safe and healthy environment with little or no campus crime, drugs, and alcohol usage.

See how this ranking was calculated.



How can parents help their kids from being bullied?

Parents can play a central role to preventing bullying and stopping it when it happens. Here are a few things you can do.

  • Teach kids to solve problems without using violence and praise them when they do.
  • Give children positive feedback when they behave well to help their build self-esteem. Help give them the self-confidence to stand up for what they believe in.
  • Ask your children about their day and listen to them talk about school, social events, their classmates, and any problems they have.
  • Take bullying seriously. Many kids are embarrassed to say they have been bullied. You may only have one chance to step in and help.
  • If you see any bullying, stop it right away, even if your child is the one doing the bullying.
  • Encourage your child to help others who need it.
  • Don’t bully your children or bully others in front of them. Many times kids who are bullied at home react by bullying other kids. If your children see you hit, ridicule, or gossip about someone else, they are also more likely to do so themselves.
  • Support bully prevention programs in your child’s school. If your school doesn’t have one, consider starting one with other parents, teachers, and concerned adults.



Bullying and Suicide

The relationship between bullying and suicide is complex. Many media reports oversimplify this relationship, insinuating or directly stating that bullying can cause suicide. The facts tell a different story. In particular, it is not accurate and potentially dangerous to present bullying as the “cause” or “reason” for a suicide, or to suggest that suicide is a natural response to bullying. We recommend media not use the word “bully-cide.”

  • Research indicates that persistent bullying can lead to or worsen feelings of isolation, rejection, exclusion, and despair, as well as depression and anxiety, which can contribute to suicidal behavior.
  • The vast majority of young people who are bullied do not become suicidal.
  • Most young people who die by suicide have multiple risk factors.
  • Some youth, such as LGBT youth, are at increased risk for suicide attempts even when bullying is not a factor.
  • A recent CDC publication provides more information on the relationship between bullying and suicide.

Read more about the possible harm of connecting bullying and suicide in what to avoid.

Above article found at:


Parents: ‘Criminal’ inaction by Penn State, frat members led to son’s death

(CNN)The parents of 19-year-old Timothy Piazza, who died after participating in a hazing ritual at a Penn State fraternity, say the students who have been charged in the case “murdered” their son, and called the system governing fraternities at the university “criminal.”

“They killed him,” Jim Piazza said in an interview with CNN, referring to members of Beta Theta Pi who now face charges in the February 4 death of his son.
“They fed him lethal doses of alcohol and they killed him, and then they treated him like a rag doll, like road kill, they slapped him around, threw water on him, one kid punched him.”
His son died following his first night of pledging at Beta Theta Pi — a fraternity that was supposed to be alcohol-free at Penn State, a result of a suspension eight years ago. The university has now permanently banned the fraternity from operating on campus.  Click here to read more

Former Somerville athletes say hazing went undetected before assault

Galileo Mondol, shown in 2016, is suing the city of Somerville for more than $1 million

– Boston Globe by Dina Rudick/Globe Staff

Somerville’s mayor and school officials have insisted for nearly four years that they did all they could to prevent members of the high school soccer team from indecently assaulting three teammates during a city-run summer sports camp in the Berkshires. They described the incident, which involved the crude use of a broomstick, as an isolated crime.

But three former captains of the Somerville High School soccer team and at least five other players who attended the 2013 camp have testified under oath that the broomstick assault was preceded that weekend by numerous incidents of sexualized misconduct that purportedly went undetected by Somerville coaches and chaperones who were responsible for supervising the student-athletes.

The two juveniles who pleaded guilty to the assaults and served 13 months in youth detention facilities also gave sworn statements that they were victims of hazing or sexual misconduct at Somerville’s sports camp the previous summer. Click here to read entire article

Louisiana teachers arrested in bullying case

Cops: Teacher told girl to kill herself, forced other kids to bully her


Forced fights

St. Landry Parish Sheriff Bobby Guidroz said he learned of the accusations back in February after the girl’s mother filed a complaint. The mother returned to the sheriff’s office in April to say the abuse was continuing.
Deputies said Shelvin, a teacher at Washington Elementary, threatened to fail three of her students if they didn’t fight the girl. She also allegedly told the bullied girl to “go and kill herself.”
In a police report obtained by CNN, a student involved in the incident told deputies that Shelvin forced her to start a fight that resulted in several students sent to the principal’s office.