National Bullying Prevention Month

National Bullying Prevention Month is a campaign in the United States founded in 2006 by PACER’s National Bullying Prevention Center.[1] The campaign is held during the month of October and unites communities nationwide to educate and raise awareness of bullying prevention. Traditionally held the first week in October, the event was expanded in 2010 to include activities, education, and awareness building for the entire month. National Bullying Prevention Month is recognized in communities across the United States, with hundreds of schools and organizations signing on as partners. Facebook,[2] CNN[3] and Yahoo! Kids[4] have supported the month through media outreach and dissemination.

 

 

Learn more: https://en.wikipedia.org/

 

 

Sexual Assault on Campus Strategies for first year students and parents.

We owe it to our sons and daughters to have honest conversations about sexual violence and dating violence. Research repeatedly demonstrates that first-year women students, especially, are at the highest risk of sexual assault. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that much of this occurs within the first few weeks and months of school starting, so some young women are entering their first weeks of classes, already disoriented from a violation, so soon after campus orientation.

Research shows that the majority of sexual assault on campus is perpetrated by a small group of predatory males who are doing this over and over to multiple women.

by: Deborah J. Cohan, Ph.D.

Learn more:  https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/social-lights/201709/sexual-assault-campus

10 Tips to Help Stop Bullying

While generations before us may have shrugged off bullying as a part of life, we know that its effects are serious. No one at any age should be the target of repeated unwanted aggression, but school-aged children are most vulnerable. Bullies are powerful, or so they seem to the victims. Bullies use their physical strength or privy knowledge or even their social status to bring harm to others. Chronic behaviors such as threatening others, physically or verbally attacking others, spreading rumors, and excluding individuals from a group are commonly displayed by bullies. Such abuse has long-term effects on young victims. These effects include having low self-esteem, living in isolation, dropping out of school, experiencing health problems, and even committing suicide. Those who bully others face long-term effects, as well. Bullies can be more likely to abuse substances.

 

Read more:  https://www.raymondgeddes.com/10-tips-to-help-stop-bullying

Courtesy of: GEDDES School Supplies

New York Today: The City’s Bystander Effect

Good morning on this clear Monday.

The first time I dialed 911 in New York was on a subway platform at 42nd Street — last week.

A woman was bleeding on her head and neck; she had fallen on the stairs between the platform and turnstiles.

Some passengers hurried past her. Others stopped to look and moved on. Several took out their phones — not to call for help, but instead to record the scene.

Maybe you’ve witnessed a similar episode in the city: curious onlookers who hesitate to act or opt not to do anything at all.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com

 


Is there such thing as a digital bystander effect?
CreditJohn Taggart for The New York Times

Cyberbullying facts and statistics for 2016-2018

All technology these days produces both good results and notable consequences. The internet is increasingly a perfect case study for this idea. While better connecting the world and democratizing information, the internet has also allowed individuals to hide behind masks of anonymity. The “faceless evil” of the internet is a growing threat for teens, specifically when it comes cyberbullying. Despite a more recent ramping up of awareness campaigns, cyberbullying facts and statistics indicate the problem is not going away anytime soon.

Recent statistics show steady growth in cyberbullying

2007 Pew Research study found 32 percent of teens have been victims of some type of cyberbullying. Nearly a decade later, a 2016 study by the Cyberbullying Research Center found those numbers were almost unchanged. By 2016, just under 34 percent of teens reported they were victims of cyberbullying. Meanwhile, the National Crime Prevention Council puts that number much higher, at 43 percent.

Read more at: https://www.comparitech.com

Published by Sam Cook on May 25, 2018

Master the 3 “D”s of Bystander Intervention

Bystander intervention is one of the most effective ways to prevent sexual assault. An active bystander is someone who has the moral courage to find a way to safely intervene to stop a potentially dangerous situation.  In a recent survey, of the 4% of Junior Enlisted respondents who observed a high risk situation that they believed was or could have led to sexual assault, 86% intervened.*

Safety is Your Top Priority

Before jumping into a potentially dangerous situation, be smart and think about your own safety.

Ask yourself these questions:

  • How can I keep myself safe in this situation?
  • What are all the options available?
  • Who else might be able to assist me?

Learn more:  http://www.usmc-mccs.org/articles/master-the-3-d-s-of-bystander-intervention/

Australian Schools: National Day of Action Against Bullying

Take a Stand Together on the National Day of Action Against Bullying and Violence 2018

Friday the 16th of March is 2018 National Day of Action Against Bullying and Violence. This is a day for school communities to take a stand together, and demonstrate their commitment to creating a safe and supportive environment for all students.

See how they do it in Australia:  https://bullyingnoway.gov.au/NationalDay

Pre-Teens Arrested for Cyberbullying Before Girl’s Suicide

Two 12-year-olds in Florida were arrested for cyberbullying in connection with the death of a middle school student who police say hanged herself two weeks ago.

By JASON DEAREN, Associated Press

Two 12-year-olds in Florida were arrested for cyberbullying in connection with the death of a middle-school student who police say hanged herself two weeks ago.

The circumstances around the death of 12-year-old Gabriella Green on Jan. 10 led to the arrests of the two Surfside Middle School students, Panama City Beach officials said in a news release Monday.

Police did not release the names of the two children who were arrested because they are minors.

Investigators were made aware of the potential cyberbullying against the girl while looking into the death, which led them to examine several cellphones and social media accounts, the news release said.

They interviewed two suspects with their parents’ permission, and say both confessed to cyberbullying.

A police report states that one of the suspects told an investigator that she had started rumors about Green in person, and online.

“Her actions consisted of starting rumors of the victim having sexually transmitted diseases, vulgar name-calling … and threats to ‘expose’ personal and sensitive details of the victim’s life,” the police report said.

The other suspect, a boy, told police he video-chatted with Green after she told him she had attempted to hang herself and had marks on her neck, according to the report.

“(He) responded by saying something to the effect of, ‘If you’re going to do it, just do it,’ and ended the call,” police wrote. “He immediately regretted that statement, and began calling and text-messaging her, but did not receive a response.”

Green’s cousin, Chad Baker, told police she hanged herself with a dog leash in her closet, the police report said.

Police said the suspects did not notify any adult or authority about Green’s state of mind. The two children arrested also acknowledged that their conduct was directed at Green “knowing that said conduct would result in emotional distress.”

 

Jan. 23, 2018, at 3:57 p.m.

How can parents help their kids from being bullied?

Parents can play a central role to preventing bullying and stopping it when it happens. Here are a few things you can do.

  • Teach kids to solve problems without using violence and praise them when they do.
  • Give children positive feedback when they behave well to help their build self-esteem. Help give them the self-confidence to stand up for what they believe in.
  • Ask your children about their day and listen to them talk about school, social events, their classmates, and any problems they have.
  • Take bullying seriously. Many kids are embarrassed to say they have been bullied. You may only have one chance to step in and help.
  • If you see any bullying, stop it right away, even if your child is the one doing the bullying.
  • Encourage your child to help others who need it.
  • Don’t bully your children or bully others in front of them. Many times kids who are bullied at home react by bullying other kids. If your children see you hit, ridicule, or gossip about someone else, they are also more likely to do so themselves.
  • Support bully prevention programs in your child’s school. If your school doesn’t have one, consider starting one with other parents, teachers, and concerned adults.

Read more at http://www.ncpc.org/topics/bullying/what-parents-can-do

 

Bullying and Suicide

The relationship between bullying and suicide is complex. Many media reports oversimplify this relationship, insinuating or directly stating that bullying can cause suicide. The facts tell a different story. In particular, it is not accurate and potentially dangerous to present bullying as the “cause” or “reason” for a suicide, or to suggest that suicide is a natural response to bullying. We recommend media not use the word “bully-cide.”

  • Research indicates that persistent bullying can lead to or worsen feelings of isolation, rejection, exclusion, and despair, as well as depression and anxiety, which can contribute to suicidal behavior.
  • The vast majority of young people who are bullied do not become suicidal.
  • Most young people who die by suicide have multiple risk factors.
  • Some youth, such as LGBT youth, are at increased risk for suicide attempts even when bullying is not a factor.
  • A recent CDC publication provides more information on the relationship between bullying and suicide.

Read more about the possible harm of connecting bullying and suicide in what to avoid.

Above article found at:  https://www.stopbullying.gov/media/facts/index.html#target